Currently Teaching

  • Social History of the United States (Spring 2019)

Previous Teaching Experience

  • History of the United States until 1877 (Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018)

  • Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (Fall 2018, Summer 2017, Fall 2017)

Previous Grading Experience

  • AMH History of the United States until 1865 (Two semesters)

    • Led discussion sections (One semester)

  • Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (Two Semesters)

Additional Prepared Courses

UPPER LEVEL UNDERGRADUATE

  • The New Nation: The United States from 1783 to 1837

  • Men and Manliness in the Eighteenth-Century British World

GRADUATE SEMINARS

  • Men and Manliness in the Eighteenth-Century British World

Other Possible Courses

UNDERGRADUATE SURVEY

  • United States

    • History of the United States from 1865/1877

    • History of Women/Gender/Sexuality/or the Family in the United States

    • History of Manhood in the United States

    • LGBTQ History in the United States

    • History of the United States through Musical Theater

  • Latin America

    • History of Gender in Latin America

    • History of Sexuality in Latin America

UPPER LEVEL UNDERGRADUATE

  • Colonial/Revolutionary United States

  • Women/Gender/Sexuality in Early America

  • Atlantic Empires

  • Frontiers & Borderlands in Early America

  • United States Expansion before Manifest Destiny

  • Rights Movements in the 20th Century United States: Women, African Americans, and LGBT

  • Colonial Latin America

  • Gender/Sexuality/Queer Theory for Historians

GRADUATE SEMINARS

  • Gender/Sexuality/Queer Theory for Historians

  • Frontiers & Borderlands in Early America

  • Atlantic Empires

  • United States Expansion before Manifest Destiny

  • Women's/Gender/Sexuality/the Family in United States history

Teaching Philosophy

On every syllabus I create, I list five skills of being historians that I stress throughout my teaching and course assignments: thinking independently, thinking critically, being empathetic, compiling data and conflicting evidence, and expressing coherent ideas and arguments in writing or other means of communication. These are not skills applicable only to historians, but necessary ones for a wide number of disciplines and professions and to being an informed and participatory citizen of a nation and the globe.

I also believe it essential to present, whether in course lectures, readings, or assignments, the viewpoints, voices, images, and narratives from all social groups, especially from those groups often denied cultural, political, or economic power or whose labor and presence traditionally denied recognition as parts of history. In other words, my students leave my courses with an understanding that every person in the past was an active participant in history, although individuals could have vastly different options, opportunities, and experiences. Indeed, students recognize they, too, are active participants in history and, by critically thinking about how humans created the current social and legal realities, they have the opportunity to be active participants in what the future will look like.

Banner Picture: Perry County, Indiana Circuit Court Order Book Vol A, pg 50.